Posted in Intern advice, Written by Jenny

Coming to Uni: The essential packing

 

Coming to University is a daunting time for all involved, you’re overrun with advice on what to pack but it’s rarely uni specific. Having been at the Uni for 4 years now I feel pretty well placed to advise on this matter so here is a definitive practical guide on coming to Sheffield from an old-timer!

Top tips:

  • Don’t fall for buying single bedding, chances are your second or third year house will have a double bed. If you invest in double bedding and just get a single bottom sheet you save both money and hassle! (Plus you’ll be thankful in the cold winter).
  • Co-op, Sainsbury’s and Tesco are the main stores in Sheffield so it’s worth getting their reward cards! I know co-op and Sainsbury’s do a student-parent card that can be topped up which can be a lifesaver!
  • Get the 16-25 railcard, the £30 upfront cost for the year is easily made up and ⅓ off travel makes going home and exploring the local area much easier!
  • If you can’t drive then get a provisional licence, you really don’t want to take your passport out as ID.
  • Ease back on bringing stationary. I was too keen before the course started and got myself lots of colorful ring binders, project books etc. Most were barely used. Bring a A4 notepad, stapler, pens and pencils then sort the rest later!
  • Don’t forget about hangers, tea towels and bin bags these boring things are easily forgotten!
  • When you’re budgeting don’t forget to include the ‘easily forgotten items’- detergent, bin bags, money for topping up your laundry cards, bus/taxi money for nights out.
  • On the topic of laundry, a boring subject I know! If you are in halls you’ll have to use the shared washing machines which annoyingly don’t have draws for detergent. So make sure you get liquitabs or a gel for a proper wash.
  • Don’t leave packing until a few days before the big move, get organised and save your family the stress!
  • On move in day everyone will be raiding the shops to get essentials. So I would advise bringing as much cupboard storage stuff/ consumables as you can. Including toilet paper, toiletries, bathroom/toilet cleaner, bin bags, alcohol and cupboard food.
  • Check what is actually in your room– is there a bathroom bin? Is there a toilet brush?

Packing:

  • I would advise bringing two sets of bedding so you always have one washed- go for something that will cheer you up and brighten your room if possible. Primark and Wilkinson’s are overlooked gems!
  • Bring distinctive but non-expensive cutlery and crockery. Trust me after the first year alone you will have broken some or lost some, and a distinctive color can save on arguments on washing up plus it’s harder to use. I managed to set fire to a colander and burn a hole in a saucepan so I wouldn’t advice flashing the cash on fancy stuff.
  • Bring some storage boxes– depending on what you own this might vary but I would suggest at least bringing one. They’re ideal for student halls as you can just put them under the bed when you lift it open (that will make sense once you move in).
  • Bring shoes for uni that can withstand some serious hills and rain. You will be walking a lot in Sheffield so invest wisely.
  • Bring a winter coat. Sheffield can get very cold in winter so make sure you wrap up warm in a big cosy coat.
  • Don’t forget to bring some summery clothes as Sheffield in September can be surprisingly warm.
  • Bring a clothes horse, easy to use and set up but will save you a small fortune.
  • Bring an extension lead as the plugs are not always in the most sensible places.
  • Bring a laundry bag that you can actually carry clothes in. Depending on where you are living it can be a bit of a trek to get to the launderette.
  • A bag big enough for all the things you need to go back home for the weekend and a sleeping bag for when mates come to stay/ you visit a friends.

Hopefully you’re excited for the big move, you’re going to have a great time!

Useful shops:

  • Primark
  • Wilko
  • Argos
  • Supermarkets – especially for cutlery/crockery and housewares
  • Ikea
  • Charity shops
Posted in Intern advice, Written by Maddie

How to prepare as an international student coming to Sheffield

Studying abroad can be one of the most challenging, yet formative periods of your life. It is not an easy process, but it is one that takes you out of your comfort zone and puts you in situations that allows you to develop both personally and professionally

If you were fortunate enough to have chosen Sheffield as the university where you will be studying, than you will be happy to find out that they are doing excellent work in supporting international students adapt to the university life.

The first and most important thing to know is that the Students’ Union is led by sabbatical officers, out of which the International Student Officer is there to support all international students and advocate for their rights. They are elected out of the student body and work full time so they are available for you to knock on their door and tell them you problems. You can find the whole officer’s team, including the International Student Officer in the Student Union Building, on the 4th floor.

You can also get involved in several initiatives across the university that support a better integration of international students. One of them is the International Student Committee which advocates for cultural understanding and diversity, organising events such as International Cultural Evening or World Food Festival. You can volunteer with them and even run for a position on the committee, while getting to know loads of amazing people and advocate for cultural understanding both at university and in the wider Sheffield community.

Finally, you can get involved in your national society and share a bit of your culture with everyone else on campus.

This is only a glimpse of what opportunities the university can offer, so you can make the most of your experience, but I would also like to mention a few tips and tricks on what day to day things you could do to adjust better to this new chapter in your life.

  1. Homesickness

 

Probably one of the most common issues international students are dealing with is homesickness, which may seem inoffensive, but if let to develop can interfere with your studies and your overall experience. Fortunately there are several ways to deal with such a situation, one of which, making sure you speak to someone about it. The Nightline at university is a great place to start, as you can talk with an individual and express your feelings while being completely anonymous.

(more details here: https://www.sheffieldnightline.co.uk/)

Another way is to come together with members of your national society (or set one up!) and have traditional celebrations. And the best advice of all, make sure you stay in touch with your family. With all the deadlines and stress at university, is easy to forget to give your parents a call, but that can help you more than you think in a hard moment.

  1. Get to know the city

3 or 4 years seems like a long time to spend in a city for your degree. However, as a final year student I can attest that it passess a lot faster than you think, and by the end of your degree you find yourself not knowing the city you have lived on for so long at all. My advice here is to get out there and befriend people in your area, your neighbours, try out the attractions in Sheffield, the coffee shops and the Peak District especially, and truly become part of the community. This will give you a different outlook on the city and make you feel more at home.

  1. Know what you don’t know and how to fix it

This one applies especially if you have a different education system in your home country. Know what is expected of you as a student, what studying techniques are the most efficient ones and what are your strengths and weaknesses as well as how to apply them best. If you already thought about this but are unsure of where to start, then 301 is here for you. As an international student in Sheffield in my first year I found it difficult to understand what is expected of me in seminars, what is the best way to take notes in a lecture so I can take in all the information presented and hardest of them all, how to go through all the readings I had to do and make sure I extract the right information. The 301 academic workshops have helped me tremendously in getting a hand of all these and perform better, so if you are still unsure why not give it a try by following this link: https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/ssid/301

 

And here you have it, a few quick tips on how you can improve some of the most common issues international students are struggling with to make your life a bit easier and the university experience an unforgettable one!

 

 

Posted in Intern advice, Written by Amber

My Top Uni Experiences

I can’t believe that my degree is over, and how quickly the time went! Now that I’ve finished I’ve been looking back at my time at uni and although it was incredibly busy and sometimes stressful, I’m pleased to say I don’t think I would have done anything differently! I got involved in everything that I wanted to during my degree and my university experience was about far more than just my degree. Here are some of my favourite university experiences, you could take inspiration from these if you are looking for some ideas of what to get up to next year!

Societies

I knew before I came to university that I wanted to make the most of the huge range of societies that the university had to offer. I would advise new students not to rush into buying membership for everything, but at the same time, don’t be afraid to try something new! Societies are great as they allow you to meet people with a shared interest, but from a range of different cultures, backgrounds and fields than the people you might meet on your course. Not only this but classes/lessons through societies are often FAR cheaper than what you would be paying elsewhere! I knew I wanted to find something active and I ended up joining Bellydance Society. I fell in love with the dance and the culture that surrounds it, as well as making so many amazing friends and at the end of that year I applied to be on committee. I got the position I applied for and also continued in my position this year. As Publicity and Events Officer I have gained brilliant experience of marketing and event management including planning and running sell-out shows. Being on committee was one of the most stressful but rewarding experiences of my degree and if you find a society that you love I would really recommend applying for a committee position.

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Volunteering

At the beginning of my final year I realised that I had done lots of things for myself during my time at university, but hadn’t really done anything to give back to the community that have made me feel so welcome. So I went to the volunteering fair and looked into a range of opportunities, there is everything from helping at animal sanctuaries to working with people such as children with disabilities or elderly people in care homes. I chose to volunteer for ‘Clubbing Crew’ which runs nights out at the Student’s Union once a month (on a Friday) for adults with learning disabilities. The experience has required very little commitment – just one evening a month, finishing at 1am which meant it didn’t interfere with my study time but has been one of the most fun and rewarding experiences. The feeling of knowing you have helped someone have a good time is amazing – when you see a shy and quiet individual turn into a total diva, dancing away with a giant grin on their face, is fantastic. I would 100% recommend a volunteering project as it will benefit you and the community.

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Outreach

Throughout my degree I have been involved in outreach opportunities within my department. For me, this has consisted of volunteering at our departmental museum during open evenings (which led to me gaining a part time job as a museum tour guide) and assisting during the Animal and Plant Sciences ‘Annual Christmas Lecture’ which involves 1000 local primary school children descending on the Octagon for a lecture by a member of staff, followed by activities designed and ran by undergrad students. Although I don’t particularly want to go into teaching, the experiences have massively increased my confidence working with children and I have found it really rewarding to help inspire the next generation of scientists.

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End of year ball

The end of year ball for your department is a great way to celebrate the year with your coursemates, and a good excuse to buy that dress or suit you’ve had your eye on! The food at my ball was pretty good and although I have heard mixed things from other departments at least there is usually free alcohol to wash it all down! I would especially recommend attending your ball to final year students. I saved some money so that I would be able to buy photographs so I have memories of my time at university.

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Varsity

Even if sports isn’t your thing, I would thoroughly recommend attending a varsity event. It’s a great way to get into the unviersity spirit, particularly if you have friends competing. In particular, the final event, the ice hockey has a great atmosphere and is really good fun! However make sure you plan to get there early and either leave early or wait for the rush to finish after the event as the trams are usually packed!

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Walks in the peaks

With the Peak District on our doorstep, Sheffield is a fantastic university if you enjoy walking. During my first and second year I went on walks in the Peaks with Natural History Society (now named Nature and Wildlife Society) who run walks once a month out into the Peaks. During my final year, having been so busy I have often been unable to go walking on the dates that the society had arranged, this led me to contact the Walking Club who usually run two walks every week. Both societies are full of very friendly people and walks usually just cost a few £s in bus or train fare. Walking with a society is great if you don’t want to worry about working out transport and planning a route. If you are feeling more adventurous, obviously you can always get on a bus and go by yourself or with friends!

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I hope your time at Sheffield is as great as mine was!

Posted in Intern advice, Uncategorized, Written by Britt

The importance of travelling and working abroad

I’m sure you’ve heard everyone say it, but travelling really is an amazing experience. This is particularly the case if it’s coupled with something meaningful, for example getting involved in a programme that gives back to the community or equips you with valuable work experience.

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Last summer, I travelled to China to teach conversational English skills to 7-10 year olds at a Chinese summer camp. I can honestly say that it was the best experience of my life. After I had completed my placement, I travelled around China with some of the other summer teachers – we went to Beijing, Shanghai and of course climbed The Great Wall!

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Although such experiences are truly incredible, many volunteer/work programmes can be pretty expensive and I did have to save up for a while in order to be able to afford it. That said, the university do offer bursaries to help students fund their placements (depending on the rules of your department). For instance, I’m in the Arts & Humanities Department and I received a £500 bursary from the university which essentially paid for my return flights to China!

These things are often planned in advance so I am not suggesting that you try and get yourself onto a summer placement before uni starts! However, it is something to think about for next summer and, if you’re sure it’s something you want to do, you can certainly start saving early.

I suppose the purpose of this blog post is to encourage you to be brave. Save up, take a deep breath and go out there and see the world!

Posted in Intern advice, Written by Sophie

Getting a head start with your research over the summer

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I hope you are all having a lovely summer holidays!

Are you moving into the final year of your degree and will be writing a dissertation?  It *could* be a good idea to start researching your main idea, if you’re feeling productive.  When I first started preparing, I had to send in an idea so I could be matched up with a supervisor.  If you haven’t done this already, or if you just want to carry on developing your idea, this post may help you!  It’s not necessary to do lots and lots of research over the summer, but it could help you get a head start before your supervisor meetings, and you may have more developed questions to ask them.  Here are some tips for early research:

  1. Figure out what you’re interested in.

If you have some sort of idea of what you want to do, then great!  You can probably skip this step.  If you don’t, then no worries!  Start off by making notes/diagrams/mind-maps on topics you’re interested in within your subject.  I got my dissertation idea just from attending a lecture!  There might be something in one of the lectures that hasn’t been researched enough, you may want to apply a new concept to an already existing theory, or you may want to combine different areas within your subject.  Whichever way you decide to go about it, it all starts by deciding what area you’re most interested in and working on from that.

  1. See what’s already out there.

Start off with a simple Google Scholar/Star Plus search.  If you still don’t have a concrete idea, but you do know what you’re interested in, this could be a good idea to see what others have researched.  You may stumble across some interesting, recent articles that haven’t done X, Y and Z.  If you’re looking at a specific topic, make sure to view all recent articles written about it, so you don’t start claiming you’re filling a gap in the literature that isn’t there!

  1. Get advice from your tutors.

Even though it’s the summer holidays, you could write a list of questions as you go along, ready to ask your tutors/supervisors when you start the next academic year.  You might even find that you answer the questions yourself, just by researching.  Remember that it’s not a requirement to start research so early (unless you have been instructed to by your tutors) and that even making a list of questions is a good way to get a head start.

Disclaimer: if you feel at any point that doing research is not helping you, and that you would like to wait until the start of your next year, do not feel guilty for stopping.  I did tiny amounts over the summer, and the amount I researched did not affect my progress throughout the academic year.  Also, drop in to 301 at any time during your final year!  It’s not just for first or second years here – in fact, I only utilised the workshops/study sessions in my final year when I needed the help!  There is support in every section of the university, so don’t panic!

Posted in Intern advice, Written by Maddie

My experience with Django Girls

If there is one thing I am incapable of doing, that is understanding science of any kind. Ever since I was little I had an inclination for humanities and social sciences and despised anything that involved numbers. So it happened that in high school I focused mostly on languages and now at university I study politics and international relations. No numbers, no calculations so I am safe. Or so I thought….

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Being focused on one area is great, especially is it is something you really enjoy doing, but being a well rounded individual is also something we should aim for. Even if you think you don’t like something, how do you know for sure if you haven’t even tried it out?

That was exactly what went through my mind when I decided to sign up for a coding beginners class. For the record, I haven’t done anything related to coding in my entire life but here I was, deciding I should give it a go.

So I went! On a Saturday morning at 9 am I went down to the location where the Django Girls workshop was about to begin. We were told that by the end of the day we will build a website. On our own! Seemed a task impossible to achieve give my level of skills.

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The Django Girls project is an initiative going on all over the world with the aim to help women learn a coding language and enter a field mostly dominated by men. The workshops are ran by volunteers that support Django Girls’ mission and all the information and materials they need in order to organise a successful event are available on the Django Girls website. In order to participate you don’t have to have any knowledge of programming (ahem… that’s how I got in) but you must have a desire to learn a new skill and meet some amazing people.

The feature of the workshop I enjoyed the most was the fact that you are paired up with another participant and together are assigned a coach who walks you through the whole tutorial and is there to encourage you throughout the day. This was incredibly useful for me, as it helped me understand what exactly I was doing and give me the freedom to ask any questions that went through my mind.

You might have guessed by now that by the end of the workshop I did manage to build the website and was I proud of myself! Oh yes! Mostly because I never thought the phrase “build a website” and “me” would ever be put together.

So if you are like me and never thought that anything non-social science is for you, you might want to give this workshop a try and see how it goes. It is an amazing opportunity to discover a new community in Sheffield and be introduced to a new skill that might turn into a passion, who knows? The events happen multiple times per year and the best part is that if you enjoy being a participant, then you can go on and organise a workshop yourself in Sheffield or in your home city. Django Girls welcomes everyone who wants to spread the message and support the initiative. If you are curious to find out more have a look here: https://djangogirls.org/

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Posted in Intern advice, Written by Amber

Useful things to do over the summer

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I can’t believe the year is finally over! With a long summer break stretched out ahead of me, I’m looking forward to some well deserved rest and relaxation!

However I do often find myself getting bored over the summer so I’ve come up with some ideas on how to use all this free time in a productive way to prepare myself for studying next year!

 

Find a job or work experience

Finding a job over the summer can massively reduce your stress levels next year if you can save up some money! This gives you more time to concentrate on your studies and more freedom to enjoy doing things with your friends.

A work experience or summer placement is also a really good idea, particularly if you are lacking in relevant experience to your degree. This could give you a taste of a certain area of work to help with your career plans if you are unsure, and can strengthen your application by providing relevant experience and a range of transferrable skills. Not only this but you are likely to meet new people who could come be useful for your future career plans!

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Reading

If you have been given a reading list for your next year of study then you should probably aim to buy these books during the summer if you can afford to, rather than at the last minute during freshers when you are already going to be busy. It may be useful to take some time to familiarise yourself with the content of your books, particularly if there is a subject which will be new to you.

In addition to recommended reading, you may want to read for pleasure during the summer. This is a really great way to relax, take a break from technology but also allows you to keep your mind sharp and stay in practice of concentrating and reading ready for the next semester. You may not have time to read for pleasure during the term time, or may not want to (I get sick of the sight of books during the semester!) – so summer is the perfect time to read at your leisure. Grab a book and sit in the garden with a nice cold drink.reading-seuss

Updating your CV

Not as interesting as reading, but updating your CV while you have free time in the summer can save you time when you need it at a later date. In addition to this, reading over and updating your CV provides you with a really great opportunity to reflect on the skills you have developed in the last academic year and look back on your experiences. You can use this reflection to consider what skills and experience you may still be lacking in, and concentrate on building on these areas next year!

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Create a LinkedIn profile

Creating a LinkedIn profile allows you to connect with professionals which allows you to keep in touch with lecturers, network with new people and showcase your own achievements. This could provide amazing opportunities and out of all the ideas listed here, is definitely the one that I need to get done over the summer!

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Posted in Intern advice, Written by Jenny

UG vs. PGT: the differences

Deciding whether or not to do a Master’s degree is a big decision! But what is the difference?

My take on the Master’s students life:

In the table below I’ve noted down the key differences between my two degrees to try and make the distinction a bit clearer.

UG (Biochemistry) PGT (Molecular Medicine)
Application via UCAS Application to the University
120 credits 180 credits
9 month academic year 12 month academic year
Guided study Self-directed study
Build on assumption of low level knowledge Assume a high amount of previous knowledge
Low expectation of technical skills Higher expectation of technical skills, improvement sought
Highly supervised (laboratory) Supervision present but self-directed research
Short laboratory project Extended laboratory project
Guided opportunities for direction and feedback Expected to seek your own opportunities to ask questions and direct your learning
Wide discipline knowledge Sub-discipline knowledge
Set hours (laboratory) Expected to manage your own time
Lecturers/ researchers are seen as senior, with a clear power dynamic Lecturers/ researchers are still seen as senior but the dynamic is more of colleagues
Research seminars may be a requirement in third year Increased invites to seminars/talks and lab meetings- expectation that they will be of interest
Large class size Smaller class size
Slow moving Fast-paced


The big differences summed up:

  • Master’s level learning comes with much higher expectations of your drive, knowledge and dedication.
  • Master’s level learning is a lot more independent. You are in control of your own work and expected to manage your own time.
  • Master’s level learning is intensive, with a heavier workload and faster pace than at UG level.

This progression is cheekily summed up below:

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The main take-home message is that a Master’s degree should not just be something you undertake as you don’t know what to do, it in itself is a choice.

Posted in Intern advice, Written by Maddie

How to have a rewarding summer without an internship or a job?

The pressure of gaining experience in any possible field is increasing year after year. And every summer students from all degrees run around trying to be accepted for a  great internship scheme, get a job or a do any other activity that might increase your employability prospects after they graduate. This is all understandable, considering the competitive job market we all have to face after we have obtained our degrees.

But what do you do when you end up in a situation where you were unable to secure any internship or job over the summer period. How do you ensure you still make the most of your 3 months and develop not only professionally, but personally too?

Well, I got you covered. Below you will find a list of different activities that can be undertaken both when in Sheffield or while travelling, that will help you have a productive summer.

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  • Attend a summer school

 

This one requires a bit of preparation in advance but it can add up so much to your CV. If you have an area of study that you are interested in, but which you have not had the chance to engage that much with, then have a look at the summer schools that are running at the moment and choose that one that could be most helpful to you. You can start by looking at summer schools organised by different universities across UK and Europe (especially if you want to pursue a Master in another European country) or have a look at some think tanks and see if they organise any summer programmes. The options are endless, all that’s required from you is a quick Google search and you are ready to go!

  1. Learn a new language

This one might require a bit more self management, but everyone can agree that knowing more than one language is an incredibly useful skills to have. Maybe you studied one for A levels but haven’t practiced it in ages, or you are going on an Erasmus programme and would like to lay out the basics, or you know that in order to get your dream job you should speak more than one language. No matter what your motivations are, learning a new language is a very rewarding process. You can start with one hour per day and also mix in some more fun ways to understand the language such as watching movies, listening to songs or getting immersed in their culture. You can also build on your efforts once the summer ends and sign up for a Languages for All programme at the beginning of the year. (more details here:https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/languages/lfa )

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  1. Volunteer with one of the local charity shops

This is a great one if you like to get out of the house, meet new people, while also being passionate about social impact. Sheffield has some great charity shops that are constantly looking for volunteers such as Oxfam, Save the Children or Age UK. This experience would allow you to engage with some of the biggest charities out there and gain amazing volunteering experience, while also meeting great individuals and giving back to the community. Their opportunities are not always advertised on the usual university pages but you can easily go in and ask if they need a helping hand. I am sure they will be more than happy to take you on board.

  1. Volunteer with one of your preferred organisations

If you have a group of organisations you are interested in working with, but haven’t managed to get an internship with them, or they do not have an internship scheme at all, then this is a great way to get involved. Most of these organisations would love to have brand ambassadors in different campuses around the UK and you can facilitate that for them. Most of them are able to offer you training and provide you with more knowledge about how the organisation operates and what kind of people they are likely to recruit. If you are social sciences student looking to work with a charity, this is a great way to get involved in the sector. All you need to do is pick up the phone and offer your help!

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Overall, all these suggestions rely on your sense of initiative. There are so many other ways through which you can gain valuable experience in the field you are interested to have a career in. All you need to do is spend some time thinking of what the best course of action is for you and then start looking for opportunities. Google is always there to help you!

Posted in Intern advice, Written by Amber

Summer and Exam Services at 301

Although our workshops have ended for the summer, did you know that there are still a range of services and resources available here at 301?

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Photo by Euysuk Simon Kwon (Insagram: es_kwon)

Resources

If you have ever visited 301 you may have noticed that we have a wide range of leaflets advising on the various services of the university. If you are looking for something in particular, feel free to ask us at reception and we will do our best to help you. In addition to these leaflets, we also have a range of handouts to help with your academic skills. These are free for you to help yourself to and if you have missed a workshop for a particular topic, may be able to offer you some alternative guidance. They are found in a carousel on the right hand side of reception, as you walk in the front of the building. We also have a range of study skills books for students to read, although these must stay in reception so they can be used by any student who needs them.

 

Services

Many of the tutors who run the academic skills workshops are continuing to deliver 1:1 sessions if you need guidance with your academic skills. These sessions might help you with any work you have due or with improving your skills ready for next year! The sessions are really useful but it is important to note that our tutors can give general help (for example, the structure of an essay) but cannot give subject specific advice or comment on the content of your work.
MASH (Maths and Statistics Help) continues to run during the exam period and can be found opposite the flexible workspace. The drop in sessions allow you to be flexible with your time or you can make an appointment to ensure that you are seen. Opening times for MASH are weekdays 10am-1pm and again on Wednesday evenings 4pm-7pm (drop in only) for statistics and weekdays 1pm-4pm, with a drop in only session until 7pm on Wednesday for maths.

 

Summer 1:1s and MASH sessions are likely to run on a revised timetable so please keep an eye on our website, or pop into reception if you have any queries. https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/ssid/301

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